Syndicate content
Connexion | Contact | Site map |

For a more organic future

Bringing together all the key players in Canada's organic industry to ensure excellent standards and regulations that stimulate the growth of Canada's organic sector, which is good for the environment, the consumer, family farms and rural communities.

Of particular interest

Date: November 10, 2014
Titre: OFC' s Blog
accroche:

To Certify or Not To Certify 

The perspective of small-scale organic farmers

Small-scale organic farmers represent the face of the Canadian organic industry—at the farmers’ market, CSA drop-off and at the restaurant back door.

 

Many of these farmers, however, are not certified organic. For these growers, the expense and effort of certification isn’t justifiable, since attaining certified organic status doesn’t significantly increase sales or the trust already earned from buyers.

 

The Working Group on Small Scale Organic Certification has drafted two organic certification models that aim to be attainable for a small-scale producer focusing mainly on direct sales (farm-gate, CSA, farmer’s market, etc.): the Peer Certification Model and the Organic Affidavit model.
 

What do you perceive to be the strengths and/or weaknesses of these models? Which would be more appropriate for your farm?  Should either model include random third-party inspections—and if so, to what extent?

 

Get more information and share your perspective on OFC's Blog!

 

The Organic Value Chain Roundtable presents three new reports that provide a strong business case for going organic:

Organic Advantage. Vegetable Production
Organic Advantage. Grain Production
Organic Advantage. Beef Production

 

These commodity-specific guides targeted to conventional producers and lenders provide beef, grain and vegetable producers with an overview of the market opportunities, economics, as well as government and industry support available to help guide new entrants towards a successful transition. The reports will also be useful to lenders and others with an interest in the economic viability of organic agriculture.

Date: October 27, 2014
Titre: Canadia Organic Standards Committee
accroche:

InfoBio October 2014

New Comment Period - October 27 to December 23 2014

  • Is it possible to pasteurize organic honey?
  • Can Dextrose be used as a flavouring agent in organic products?
  • Relating to table 4.2 "Compost obtained from off-farm sources", which elements are considered "trace contaminants"?

Click here to see the proposed answers to various questions raised by organic stakeholders, regarding the National Standards for Organic Agriculture.

Nominations - Standards Interpretation Committee 

DEADLINE-NOVEMBER 3RD 2014

 

The Standards Interpretation Committee (SIC) has been created to assist the Canadian Organic Office (COO) in the interpretation of the Canadian Organic Standard (CAN/CGSB 32.310 and CAN/CGSB 32.311).

 

The terms of two committee members, Jean Duval and Janine Gibson, are ending in November 2014 and an additional vacant seat has to be filled. You are invited to submit nominations for these three positions. Click here  to learn more about the nomination process

 

 

Date: October 16, 2014
Titre: InfoBio October 2014
accroche:

Review of the Canadian Organic Standards

  • Comments from the Public Review now being assessed by the Working Groups
  • Short news...

Organic Standards Interpretation Committee  - Call for Nominations

Deadline – November 3rd 2014

 

Organic Science Cluster II

  • The Announcement of the Organic Science Cluster II is on line!
  • The Research Activity of the month - Development of sustainable alternative sources of bedding for dairy cows

Why Organic?

  • Glyphosate appears to be strongly correlated with the rise in celiac disease

  • Neonics impact all species that chew a plant, sip its sap, drink its nectar, eat its pollen or fruit

Read more

Date: October 1, 2014
Titre: InfoBio October 1st 2014
accroche:

Nominations - Standards Interpretation Committee

The Standards Interpretation Committee (SIC) has been created to assist the Canadian Organic Office (COO) in the interpretation of the Canadian Organic Standard (CAN/CGSB 32.310 and CAN/CGSB 32.311), in order to achieve uniform application of the rules to all operators through various certifying bodies.

 

The terms of two committee members, Jean Duval and Janine Gibson, are ending in November 2014 and an additional vacant seat has to be filled. You are invited to submit nominations for these three positions. Click here to learn more about the nomination process.

 

Report on the last comment period – June-August 2014

The SIC has analyzed the comments received during the last public consultation held from June to August 2014. The report  presents the Q&As as archived in the Final Q&As section.
 

Please note that the question about “Sprouts and shoots” has been removed from the Final Q&As; the SIC interpretation is under review.

Date: September 19, 2014
Titre: CELEBRATING ORGANIC WEEK!
accroche:

We all share the same standard!

Kick off your Organic Week Celebration by taking a close look at proposed revisions to the Canadian Organic Standards.

Canadian producers, processors and traders are linked by the national organic standard, drafted to create consensus around organic production and processing practices.  This standard is the basis of the whole Canadian industry. We presently have the unique chance to thoroughly review the text that defines organic food production.

 

This organic week-end, contribute your perspective by taking a look at the draft currently under review.  The deadline to receive public comments is next week, September 22nd.  All the information you need is here!

Visit Organicweek.ca for more information about other Organic Week activities!

Canadian Organic Inputs Directory

OrganicInputs.ca

OFC has launched the Canadian Organic Inputs Directory (COID).

Visit the site now and give it a try!

Manufacturers of inputs suitable for organic agriculture can contact us to find out how to get their product listed.

The Canadian Organic Input Directory is being administered by Peppersoft Inc.

(A French version of the site is coming soon)

On our blog

Date: October 30, 2014
Title: TO CERTIFY OR NOT TO CERTIFY: THE PERSPECTIVE OF SMALL-SCALE ORGANIC FARMERS
Body:

Local + organic -  A win-win situation for growers, consumers and the environment.

Small-scale organic farmers represent the face of the Canadian organic industry—at the farmers’ market, CSA drop-off and at the restaurant back door. Many of these farmers, however, are not certified organic.

 

The Working Group on Small Scale Organic Certification has drafted two organic certification models that aim to be attainable for a small-scale producer focusing mainly on direct sales (farm-gate, CSA, farmer’s market, etc.): the Peer Certification Model and the Organic Affidavit model. 

 

What do you perceive to be the strengths and/or weaknesses of these models? Which would be more appropriate for your farm?  Should either model include random third-party inspections—and if so, to what extent?

Share your perspective on OFC's Blog!

Date: September 28, 2012
Title: PROTECT ORGANIC AGRICULTURE
Body:
How to Prevent and Manage
GMO Contamination Risks

Today, the OFC invites you to voice your concerns and share your opinions about how to prevent and manage GMO contamination risks.

 

Do you have GMO contamination issues or concerns on your own organic operation? What would help you prevent and mitigate GMO contamination?
The OFC Blog is ready to collect your thoughts.

 

 

Let us know what you think should be the next step taken to help protect the integrity of organic products and Canada’s pristine natural environments!

Date: August 17, 2011
Title: No Intraprovincial Organic Regulations in Canada: what is the impact on the development of the Canadian organic sector?
Body:

The Canadian Organic Products Regulations (OPR) were implemented in June 2009 but they do not cover organic products produced and sold within the same province.  The province of Quebec is the only province where the intraprovincial organic market is strictly regulated.

What is the impact of not having organic products regulated and certified in local markets? Does it reduce consumer confidence in the organic designation, or can it have an impact on the value of the organic premium? Visit OFC Blog to let us know your opinion!

Date: April 7, 2011
Title: The impact of GE alfalfa on organic production
Body:

Genetically modified (GM) alfalfa has been approved for planting in the US and is one step away from being sold as seed in Canada. Please describe on OFC Blog what would be the impact of the introduction of GM alfalfa on your farming operations?

Date: April 28, 2010
Title: Organic Grain-Forage Rations in Fattening Phase of Slaughter Animals
Body:

Issue your comment on the feeding of slaughter animals in fattening phase.

Date: April 8, 2010
Title: Parallel production
Body:

Are you in favor of parallel production? Should Canada be more flexible on the issue of parallel production? If it were allowed, could parallel production be managed without compromising organic integrity? Leave your comment on OFC's blog.

© Organic Federation of Canada